Old-Fashioned Granny Plant Holder

I won’t deny being an old hippie–I guess there are worse fates. And if I search my old hippie memory, I seem to remember a time when everyone was doing macrame, really hideous macrame, making things like owl wall hangings. One way I liked macrame, though, was for making plant hangers. Plant hangers knotted with natural jute string were like plant cozies, and plants seemed to like them. Spooked by the owl wall hangings, though, I never learned macrame, but recently was browsing through a copy of “American Home’s Best Projects, 1977,” when I came across a feature about crocheting granny squares with string, making pillows and rugs, and a plant hanger. A crocheted plant hanger I could do. It was called an “Old-Fashioned Granny” Plant Holder, and was made from five granny squares crocheted with jute string. I went out and purchased a ball of 3-ply natural jute for 99 cents, rummaged around for a Size I crochet hook, and soon was crocheting. Crocheting with jute is not easy, but this is a small project, and the pain will soon end.

Note: I discovered that one 219-feet ball of jute isn’t enough for this project–it uses two.

Materials: two balls 3-ply natural jute, a ball of thinner jute (see example below), a Size I crochet hook, and a large needle.

Procedure: Crochet five granny squares, as follows:

Ch 4. Join with sl st to form ring. Do not turn work.

Round 1: Ch 3; working over yarn end, 2 dc in ring, (ch 2, 3 dc in ring) 3 times; ch 2, sl st in top of ch-3, 3 sl st to ch-2 sp.

Round 2: Ch 3, (2 dc, ch2, 3 dc) in ch-2 sp, *ch 1, (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, repeat from * 2 times; ch 1, sl st in top of ch-3, 3 sl st to ch-2 sp.

Round 3: Ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in ch-2 sp,* ch1, 3 dc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch-2 sp, repeat from * 2 times, ch 1, 3 dc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, sl st in top of ch-3, 3 sl st to ch-2 sp.

Using the thinner jute and a large needle, sew one edge of each of four squares to all four sides of the fifth square. Sew side seams together, forming an open cube. For hanging, secure desired length of jute  to seams with a few firm knots. Fasten the four top ends together and hang from a hook. This plant holder is for a 6-inch plastic flowerpot with saucer.

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5 thoughts on “Old-Fashioned Granny Plant Holder

  1. Wow – add some incense burners, and Jodi Mitchell on the phonograph (remember those?) and you’ve got the whole 70s vibe! This is really pretty. I used to crochet in the 70s, my early teens, but I think I forgot how. I wonder if “body memory” would kick in, like with riding a bike? Is macrame the same as crochet except with larger stitches and coarse yarn, like jute?

    1. I still have the Joni Mitchell albums! Macrame involves knotting so it’s not really the same as crochet.But if you knew how to crochet once, you can learn it again. This plant hanger pattern uses only the chain stitch and double crochet, so the pattern is simple. It’s the jute that takes getting used to! Come to think of it, you could use a thinner jute to make a smaller plant hanger–it might be easier way to begin.

      1. Cool! And, I guess if we REALLY want the 70s groove to come through, we could use hemp yarn!! : ) Kidding!

        My gosh, I can’t believe I called Joni “Jodi” – the artist of one of my fave songs, Woodstock! I’m sure she’ll understand that we old hippies are failing in memory at this point . . .

        Thanks for a great blog, Fran!

  2. Does that book have a pattern for a jute crocheted Corning Ware holder? I lent my book to a friend and “her husband threw it out”. Or so the story goes…….. thanks!

    1. No, it doesn’t–the patterns were all for little pots and glass jars. Depending on the shape of the Corning Ware, you might be able to use the granny square idea to design your own plant holder. It’s a thought, anyway! Fran

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